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THE PROBLEMS FACING THE FARMING SECTOR IN SOUTH AFRICA
1. Water shortage: This is due to the fact that most of South Africa receives little rainfall. The large part especially in the West in semi arid and the rivers do not contain enough water and the dams experience the problem of silting. The water available is not enough and is under high competition posed by other sectors like mining manufacturing industry and tourism.
2. Labor shortage: This is due to fact that there is competition from other sectors, which are more lucrative than agriculture. People run away from agriculture and go to the mining sectors, manufacturing industries and tourism leading to the problem of labor supply in the farms.
3. The shortage of labor is also caused by political and social unrest that has been prevailing from long time ago during the Apartheid system. In fact, the problems of apartheid system have not been totally eradicated; there still exists some relics, (vestiges) of apartheid in South Africa.
4. Severe erosion since the soil in South Africa is unstable and has been exposed to erosion as a result of overgrazing. Overgrazing has been caused by overstocking.
5. Land shortage since most of the land is under mining, towns and manufacturing industries. The land in the western part of the country is dry hence unfit for the rain – fed agriculture except under irrigation.
6. Unreliable rainfall availability is another problem. Sometimes the rainfall is not available leading to the occurrence of drought.
7.There is low capital availability among the Africans leading to poor investment in agriculture.
EcoleBooks | GEOGRAPHY A LEVEL(FORM SIX) NOTES - 5.1 AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT(2)
North America is dominated by the United States and Canada. Agriculture is one of important economic sectors in North America and is well divers
ified. Agriculture is highly advanced due to the use of advanced technology associated with mechanization. Factors which have led to the agricultural development in North America include availability of rich agricultural land, conducive climate whose variation has contributed to the diversification of agricultural activities, relief which has allowed good drainage and mechanization due to being either flat or undulating, the use of advanced technology which has facilitated the use of mechanized methods in the production process, market availability, power supply as well as enough capital which could easily be invested in the agricultural development.
In Canada the prairies and the Great Lakes – St. Laurence Lowlands that produce 90% of the Canada’s agricultural output. Prairies which include Manitoba Saskatchewan and Alberta are the most important agricultural region in Canada famous for producing 95% of Canada’s wheat. Other regions include Maritime Provinces (New Brunswick, Novascoti, and Prince Edward Islands), Lakes peninsula where farms are highly mechanized and electrified, Few parts of the British Columbia. The Canadian Shield area is generally unsuitable for agriculture because of its cold climate, poor soils, underdeveloped transport and communication network, and insignificant markets. Only two areas in this region have been successfully farmed namely the Cochrane Clay Belt and the Clay Belt of the Saguenay Basin where oats, barley, potatoes, vegetables, and hay are gown and dairy farming is practiced.
Most farms are worked on individual’s basis and new employ hired labour farm size averages range from 140 hectares and above. Farming is highly mechanized and advanced methods of cultivation are used. Crop rotation is used and manure as well as artificial fertilizer is used. Crop rotation involves wheat or barley, oats, or other fodder crops like Alfa and clover. Planting is done at the end of April or early in May. By the middle of August some maize is out as fodder or it is chopped up stored as solage. The rest of the crop is harvested by autumn (September – October). Most of the farms in the Corn Belt are mixed that is they involve both crop production and rearing (husbanding) of animals. The animals kept include beef cattle, and pigs. The Corn Belt leads in keeping livestock in the USA.
EcoleBooks | GEOGRAPHY A LEVEL(FORM SIX) NOTES - 5.1 AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT(2)
EcoleBooks | GEOGRAPHY A LEVEL(FORM SIX) NOTES - 5.1 AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT(2)
EcoleBooks | GEOGRAPHY A LEVEL(FORM SIX) NOTES - 5.1 AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT(2)


EcoleBooks | GEOGRAPHY A LEVEL(FORM SIX) NOTES - 5.1 AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT(2)

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  • EcoleBooks | GEOGRAPHY A LEVEL(FORM SIX) NOTES - 5.1 AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT(2)

    stephen, April 10, 2024 @ 4:40 pm Reply

    Good

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