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TERM I MATHEMATICS TOPICAL BREAKDOWN FOR P.2

  1. Sets
    1. Naming sets
    2. Drawing sets
    3. Matching sets
    4. Comparing sets
    5. Ordering sets
    6. Subsets
    7. Intersection set
    8. Empty sets
    9. Joining (addition sets
    10. Subtraction of sets
  2. Numeration system and place values
    1. Drawing tens and ones
    2. Filling in tens and ones
    3. Showing tens and ones on the abacus
    4. Drawing hundreds , tens and ones
    5. Filling in hundreds , tens and ones
    6. Finding place values of the given number
    7. Expanded form
  3. Operation of number s
    1. Addition of tens and ones
    2. Addition of hundreds, tens and ones
    3. Word statements
    4. Addition of number line
  4. Multiplication
    1. Multiplication as repeated addition
    2. Multiplying two digit numbers by one digit number
    3. Word statements in multiplication
  5. Subtraction
    1. Subtraction of tens and ones
    2. Subtraction of hundreds, tens and ones
    3. Word statements
    4. Subtraction using a number line
  6. Number sequence
    1. Counting in ones
    2. Counting in twos
    3. Counting in threes
    4. Counting in fours
    5. Counting in fives
    6. Counting tens

7.  Graphs

i)  picto graph

ii)  bar graphs

 

8.  Geometry

Shapes

  1. Naming shapes
  2. Drawing shapes
  3. Matching shapes
  4. Colouring shapes

     

1.  Theme 1: Our school and neighbourhood

Content: sets

What is a set? A set is a collection of things or objects.

Naming sets Drawing sets

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comA set of trees A set of triangles

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

ecolebooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comA set of balls A set of cups

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comThis is an empty set  A set of 3 chairs

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

2.  Drawing of sets

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comA set of four flowers

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com  ______________set

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comA set of six rulers

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

More work showing the sets to be given to learners.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com3.  Matching sets

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

3+2 4

2+2 5

3+3 6

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com4.  Make small sets from the big set

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com A set of cups

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  A set of trees

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  A set of balls

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comA set of triangles

Image From EcoleBooks.com

A set of chairs

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

A set of squares

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.  Comparing sets

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  A B  C

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

  1. Set A has two members
  2. Set B has three members
  3. Set C has four members
  4. Set A has less members than set B
  5. Set B has more members than set A
  6. Set C has more members than set B
  7. Set A and B have five members altogether
  8. Set B and C have seven members altogether

6.  Ordering sets

We order sets according to number of members in any given set.

Sets can be ordered in the following ways;

  1. Ascending order

We start with a set with fewer members so that with more members. (use ordinal nos.)

6th  sixth

5th  fifth

 4th  fourth

3rd  third

2nd  second

 1st  first

 

Example

 

 

Arrange the given sets in ascending order

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comX Y Z

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Set Y comes first (1st)

Set Z comes second (2nd)

Set X comes third (3rd)

 

7.  Descending order

We start with a set with more members to that with fewer members

Arrange these sets in descending order (from biggest to the smallest)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comR S T V

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

Set T comes first (1st )

Set R comes second (2nd)

Set S comes third (3rd)

Set V comes fourth (4th )

 

8.  Subsets

What is a subset?

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comThis is a small set got from a big set

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comA set of __________________

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comA set of __________________

Image From EcoleBooks.comA set of __________________

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comForm a bImage From EcoleBooks.comig set from the small sets

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

9.  Ringing or grouping sets

Image From EcoleBooks.comRing sets of twos.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

 

How many groups have you formed?

How many members are in each sub set?

How many members are there altogether?

NB: a teacher has to ring in threes, fours, fives etc.

 

 

10.  The intersection set

This is the set where we write the common members

Example of intersection areas (common parts)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comA B X Y

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com  

Intersection set

Ո = it is the symbol for intersection set

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comA  B A = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5}

0 1 2 2 4 6 B = { 2, 4, 6, 8}

3 4 5 8

 

List down the common members

 A Ո B = {2, 4}

How many members are in the intersection set or common parts? Two members

Representing the information on the venn diagram

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  M N

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  M  

Image From EcoleBooks.comN

 

 

11.  Empty sets

An empty set is a set with out or with no members

Image From EcoleBooks.comThe symbols of an empty set are

Image From EcoleBooks.com   0r { }

More examples of empty sets

A set of boy with four legs

A cow with three eyes

A girl with two heads

Another name for empty set is null set.

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com12.  Joining or adding sets

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  + =  

 

 6 + 3  =  9 ref. bk 2 pg 8

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com13.  Subtraction of sets

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com =  

 

 

 4 – 1  =  3  Ref Mk bk 2 pg 9-10

(More of this work will be given to learners)

Topical revision of sets

14.  Numeration system and place values

Review of primary one work i.e. counting orally from zero to fifty

Write number names from 0-50

(NB: mind the spellings)

Review of counting from 50 – 100 (in tens)

Write number names from 50 – 100

Counting from 100-200

Write in hundreds from 100 – 900

NB: Let these can be 3-4 lessons)

(More lessons can be taught from this content depending on the availabity and time)

Number words from 100 – 1000

15.  Tens and ones

The teacher should draw ten sticks to show one bundle of tens e.g (Review of P.1 work)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  IIIIIIIIII = IIIIIIIII = 1 bundle of tens

I I I I = 24

 2tens  4 ones  = 24

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  

 

3 tens 5 ones  = 35

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comDraw tens and ones

a)  1 tens  5 ones  = b)  2 tens 0 ones =

 

c)  0 tens and 6 ones = d)  3 tens and 4 ones =

 

e)  0 tens 8 ones  f)  5 tens and 5 ones

h)  6 tens and 3 ones

  • Drawing hundreds, tens and ones.

16.  Completing hundreds, tens and ones

T  O  =

a)  1  4  1 tens  4 ones

T  O

b)  5  6  ____tens _______ones

Image From EcoleBooks.comc)  3 tens 5 ones =

d)  ____ tens _____ 0nes = 65

e)  146 = _____ hundreds ____ tens _____ ones.

f)  200 = _____ hundreds ____ tens _____ ones.

g)  754 = _____ hundreds _____tens _____ ones.

17.  Fill in the missing numbers

______tens ______ones = 18 _____tens _____ones = 7

______tens ______ones = 24 _____tens _____ones = 30

_____= 0 tens 6 ones  _____= 1 tens 9 ones

_____ hundreds ____ tens ____ ones = 156

_____ hundred _____ tens ____ ones = 239

Image From EcoleBooks.com9 hundred 7 tens 6 ones =

Image From EcoleBooks.com2 hundred 7 tens 4 ones =

18.  What number is shown on the abacus?

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  T O  T O

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  = =

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  T O  H  T  O

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  =  =

Image From EcoleBooks.com  

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  H  T  O

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  =

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

Show each of the numbers on the abacus

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com29 =  T  O  40 =  T  O

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com

251 =  H  T  O 364 = H  T  O

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.com  

19.  Write place value for each digit.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com1.  1  3  4 2.  7  1  6

Ones  ones

Tens tens

Hundreds  hundreds

3.  46

4.  702

5.  23

6.  812

7.  93

8.  06

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comWrite the place values of the circled numbers

1.  1  9  3  = tens

2.  7  8  = ones

3.  4  0  6  = ______

4.  2  1  6   = _____

5.  4  3   = _________

6.  What is the place value of 7 in 374?

 

20.  Expanded form

Expand these numbers

18 = ________+__________

24= ______+_________

106=_______+_______ + _______

400=_____+_______ + ________

580=______+______ + ________

What number has been expanded?

13 = 10 + 3 700 + 0 + 0 = _________

30 = 30 + 0 10 + 8 = _____

400 + 0 + 6 = ______ ______= 500 + 50 + 5

21.  Operation of numbers

Addition

24 + 10 = ____

 

2  4  1  0 2  3  5

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com+  1  0  +  4 +  2  3  

 

 

 2  0  7 5  0  0 4  8  3

+  2  4  0 +  2  3  6 +  4  0  3

 

22.  Word statements

Dora has 24 pens. Daddy gave her more 10 pens. How many pens does she have altogether?

 

 T  O

 2  4

Image From EcoleBooks.com+  1  0

Image From EcoleBooks.com  3  4 pens

 

NB: The teacher should emphasize the key words in the statements

Ref: Mk bk 2 page 35

 

23.  Adding using a number line

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com3+2 = 5

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  

 

4+4= 8

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comNB: Teachers should discourage learners from jumping a number lineor using

24.  Multiplication

Multiplication as repeated addition

2 +   2+   2 = 6

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

3 x 2 = 6

3 twos = 6

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com = 6

 

NB: Continue with 3,4,5 etc

Multiply two digit numbers by one digit number. (vertically)

Multiply by ( 2, 3, 4, 5)

 

 2  3 4  1 2  0 1  3  0

 X  2 x  3 x  5 x 3

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

Word statements about multiplication.

One hen has two legs. How many legs have four hens.

 4 x2 = _____legs NB: Teacher should give more examples.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

_____

Image From EcoleBooks.com 5

Image From EcoleBooks.com

___  3  2x  2  ____

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

0

  _______

 

 

3

0

2

3

4

X

 

6

  

 

 

26.  Subtraction

Ten balls – six balls =

10 balls – 6 balls = ____ balls

22 eggs – 11 eggs = _____eggs

Subtraction of two and three digit numbers but without regrouping.

NB: Use the knowledge of place values to re-arrange the figures

a)  3 6 – 0 4  b)  5 5 – 40

 3  6 5  5

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com –  0  4  –  4  0

 

 

8  2  4 3  9  6 7  5  2

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com–  2  1 –  3  0  4 –  7  0  2

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

27.  Word statements

  • Sixteen takeaway nine equals = __________
  • Subtract eight from ten equal _______
  • What is the difference between 343 and 140
  • A class has 44 children, ten of them are absent. How many are present?

    NB: the teacher should give more examples.

    The teacher should emphasis the key words

28.  Subtract using a number line

Image From EcoleBooks.com9-6=3

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  

 

7 – 5 = 2

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  

NB: |Encourage the learner to circle the answer.

 

29.  Number sequence

Count in ones and fill in the missing numbers eg

0,1,2,3,____, _____,6,7,_____,9,____

56, 57, _____, ____, 60

101, 102, 103, _____, _____, 106

NB:

  • Teacher will guide the learners to fill in the missing numbers in twos, threes, fives and tens
  • Filling in the missing numbers should be done both in ascending and descending order.
  • Teach about the numbers; before, after and between

 

30.  Graphs

Picto graphs / picture graphs

This is information represented in form of pictures

Example 1

Four girls picked eggs on Saturday

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.com


 

   

Ann

Nora

Dora

Sara

Questions

  1. How many eggs did Dorah pick?
  2. Who picked the least number of eggs?
  3. Name the children with the similar number of eggs?
  4. How many eggs were picked by the four girls altogether?

 

The teacher should give more examples on picto graphs

32.  Bar graph

This is a graph having bars that pupils should study and interprete in order to answer the questions

Ref: fountain primary mathematics book 2 pg 56-59

 MK bk 2 page 69

 

 

 

33.  GEOMETRY

Shapes : Examples of shapes and their sizes

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

 


 

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Triangle

Square

Circles

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.com


 

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Rectangle

Oval

Cylinder

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com


 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Semi circle

Kite

Pentagon

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.com

  

Cone

  

NB: the teacher should give varying exercises about shapes;

  • Matching
  • Drawing
  • Shading
  • Counting
  • Naming
  • Comparing

Ref: MK bk 2 pg 72

 

P.2 NUMBERS TERM II

Topical breakdown

  1. Capacity
  • Defining and identifying liquids
  • Comparing capacity
  • Addition of litres
  • Subtraction of litre
  • Word statements
  1. Operation of number
  • Addition of two digit numbers with regrouping
  • Word statement in addition of two digit numbers with regrouping
  • Division (short and long without getting a remainder)
  • Word statements about division
  1. Fraction
  • Definition
  • Drawing and naming fraction
  • Shading fractions
  • Reading and writing fractions
  • Comparing fractions
  • Addition of fractions
  • Subtraction of fractions
  1. Algebra
  • Finding missing numbers by adding
  • Finding missing numbers by subtraction
  • Word statements about finding missing numbers in addition and subtraction
  1. Measurements
  • Lengths
  • Definition
  • Things used to measure length
  • Examples of things or objects whose lengths can measured and units to measure length
  • Comparing length of different objects
  • Addition of length
  • Subtraction of lengths
  • Picture interpretation
  1. Weight (mass)
  • Definition
  • Things whose weight can be measured
  • Things used to measure weight and units comparing weight of different objects
  • Subtraction of weight

 

LESSON NOTES PRIMARY TWO TERM TWO

1. Capacity

Capacity is the amount of liquid a container can hold.

Examples of liquids

Examples of liquids.

  • Water – Paraffin
  • Soda – Cooking oil etc
  • Milk
  • petrol

Some of the common containers we use to measure liquids.

  • Kettle – glass
  • Bottle – pot
  • Bucket – drum
  • Basin – jerrycan

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com2. Comparing containers we use to hold liquids.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.commug bucket pot jerrycan

A mug holds less water than a bucket.

A pot holds more water than a mug.

A jerrycan holds more water than a pot.

A pot holds less water than a jerrycan.

  • The standard unit for capacity is litres (L)
  • We can also use ½ litre to measure capacity.
  • Less liquids like medicine , safi etc are measured in mililitres (ml)

3.Practical activity

  • Children will use 1 litre and ½ litre containers to fill the bigger container.
  1. How many ½ litre containers can fill a 1 litre container?
  2. Find how many ½ litres fill a 2 litre container
  3. Find how many ½ litres fill a 5 litre container?

4. Addition of litres

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

–  ½l  +  ½l  = 1 litre  

 ½l  +  ½l  =  1 litre

–  2 litres   +  3 litres  =  5 litres

 5 litres   +  4 litres  =  ___ litres

 9 litres   +  5 litres + 4 litres = ____ litres

 2 litres 1  2 litres 2  4 litres

+  7 litres    + 1  0 litres +  1  3 litres  

_________ __________  ____________

Word statements.

5. Subtraction of litres.

9 litres – 4 litres = ___ litres

10 litres – 3 litres = ____ litres

 7 litres 3  6 litres

  • 2 litres –  2  0 litres

_________ ____________

6. Word statements

Addition of 2 digit numbers with regrouping

1  6 1  6 2  8

+  5  +  8  + 7  

_________   _________   __________

 

5  9 7  9 4  2 1  6   2 5

+1  4  +  1  3  +  2  9  +  1  4  +1   5

_______   __________   ___________   __________   ________

7. Word statements in addition of 2 digit numbers with regrouping

  • There are 13 boys and 17 girls in P.2 class.

    How many children are there altogether?

  • Joan had 26 sweets. Her mother gave her 9 more sweets. How many sweets did she have altogether?

8. Division:

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comThe signs used are ÷ or

Examples:

4 ÷ 2  16 ÷  4 25 ÷ 5 =

6 ÷ 3  20 ÷  5 18 ÷ 2 =

10 ÷ 2  24 ÷ 4 21 ÷ 3 =

 

9. Long division

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comExamples:

Image From EcoleBooks.com 2 12 4 20 4  16 3  30

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com5 15 5 25 2  22 3  15

 

10.statements

Examples

1.  Share 4 mangoes equally between 2 girls

 How many mangoes does each get?

2.  Divide 12 by 2

3.  4 boys shared 24 pencils equally.

 How many pencils did each get?

4.  Divide 24 by 3

 

11. Fractions

A fraction is a part of a whole.

– cutting, folding and naming fractions (practical work)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comExamples:

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com   ¼ ¼ 1/3  

 ½ ½   ¼ ¼  1/3 1/3  

a whole a half a quarter a third

Naming fractions.

12. Identifying the fraction of the shaded part

Examples:

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com(a) (b)   (c)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com 2 3  2   4 9   6  

13. Shading the given fraction

Examples:

Shade these fractions

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

3  1 5

8   4 8

 

14. Comparing fractions.

– Using bigger than or smaller than (practical work)

– Using greater than, less than or equal to

  (>) (<) =

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comExamples:

Image From EcoleBooks.com1 1

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com 2 1  4

3  

 

Which part is bigger?

Which part is smaller?

15. Use greater than, less than or equal to ( >, < or =_)

½ is ________________ ¼

¼ is ________________ 1/3

1/3 is _______________ 1/3

16.Fraction of the unshaded part

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comWhat fraction is unshaded? (not shaded)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comExamples:

Image From EcoleBooks.com

(a)   (b) (c)

17. Addition of fractions with the same denominations

Examples:

(a)  1 + 1 = 1 + 1 = 2 = 1

 2 2 2 2

 

(b)  1 + 2 = 1 + 2 = 3

 4 4 4 4

 

(c)  2 + 3 + 1 = 2 + 3 + 1 = 6

 9 9 9   9 9

Word statements

18. Subtraction of fractions.

Examples:

(a)  3 – 2 = 3 – 2 = 1

 4 4 4 4

 

(b)  5 – 3 =

 9 9

 

(c)  7 – 5 =

 10 10

Word statements

19. ALGEBRA:

Find the missing numbers

Examples:

Image From EcoleBooks.com  + 4 = 7

Image From EcoleBooks.com  + 6 = 10

Image From EcoleBooks.com8 +   = 12

Image From EcoleBooks.com5 +   = 15

20. Word problems:

Examples

1.  ___________ plus four equals seven.

2.  ___________ plus zero equal nine.

3.  Ten plus ___________ equals twelve.

Revision:

21. Finding missing numbers in subtraction

Examples:

Image From EcoleBooks.com1.  9 – 3 =

Image From EcoleBooks.com2.  5 – 0 =

Image From EcoleBooks.com3.  10 –   = 4

Image From EcoleBooks.com4.  8 –   = 6

Image From EcoleBooks.com5.  15 –   = 10

22. Find the missing numbers when the box is at the beginning of a statement

Examples:

Image From EcoleBooks.com1.   – 3 = 6  

Image From EcoleBooks.com2.  – 7 = 10  

Image From EcoleBooks.com3.  – 5 = 12  

Image From EcoleBooks.com4.  – 0 = 15

23. Word problems

Examples:

1.  Eight takeaway three equals __________________

2.  Ten takeaway three equals __________________

3.  Seven takeaway _________________ equals fifteen.

4.  Sixteen takeaway ______________ equals twelve.

5.  __________________ takeaway three equals seven.

Topical revision exercise:

24. Length

Length is how long or short an object is. Or

Length is the distance between two points.

 

25. Things we use to measure length

  • meter ruler – handspan
  • short ruler  – arm’s length
  • string – fathom
  • stick – feet
  • stride
  • Measuring different objects at school practically – using strings, sticks, strides, arm’s length etc.

26. Comparing length of different objects

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  A

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com B

Image From EcoleBooks.comString A is longer than string B

String B is shorter than string A

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comX

Y

Tree x is taller than tree Y.

Tree Y is shorter than tree X.

The units for length are metres (m) and centimeters (cm)

27. Addition of length.

7m + 2m =

9m + 4m + 2m =

6 cm 3  2cm 4  4m 4  3m

+  2 cm +  1  4cm +  2  3m +  6m

________   ____________   ___________ ____________

 

28. Picture interpretation:

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com 7 metres

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  House  girl

 

 

6 metres 5 metres

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

tree

  1. What is the distance from the house to the tree?
  2. What is the distance from the tree to the girl?
  3. What is the distance from the house to the girl?
  4. What is the longest distance?
  5. What is the shortest distance?
  6. What is the total distance around the pictures?

29.Subtraction of length.

9m – 6m = ___m  8cm – 3cm = ____cm

14m – 5m = ___m  12cm – 6cm = ____cm

 1  6m 2  6m 4  9m

 –  4m –  1  3m –  3  4m

 _________ ___________ ___________

 6  3cm 7  4cm

–  2  0cm –  1  4cm  

___________ __________

30. Weight( mass)

How heavy or light someone or something is.

Weighing different objects practically

For example; stones, books, bags etc.

  • Weighing children in class using the weighing scale.

NB: show learners the different kinds of weighing scales.

31. Comparing the weight of different objects

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comUsing heavier than or lighter than.

1.

A stone A pencil

  1. Which object is heavier?
  2. Which object is lighter?

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com2. Paul

  Ali

(a)  Who is lighter?

(b)  Who is heavier?

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com3. A

  B

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

32. Addition of weight

5kg + 3kg = ____kg 12kg + 2kg + 3kg =

13kg + 4 kg =  10kg + 7kg =

1  2g  3  6kg 4  5kg

+  1  4g +  1  2kg   +  2  3kg

 _________  __________ ___________

33. Subtraction of weight

10kg = 3kg = ____kg

14kg – 5kg = ____kg

1  9kg  2  3kg 9  4kg

 –  6kg –  1  3kg –  5  0kg

__________ __________ __________

 

 5  4g  7  4g 6  6kg

–  2  0g –  5  4g –  3  3kg

 _________ ___________ ___________

 

P.2 NUMBERS TERM III LESSON NOTES

Topical breakdown

1.  MEASURES

a)  Time (introduction)

b)  Telling time in full hours

c)  Showing time in full hours

d)  Telling time in half past

e)  Showing time in half hours

f)  Telling time using a quarter past……

g)  Showing time using a quarter past……

h)  Telling time using a quarter to ……..

i)  Showing time using a quarter to …….

j)  Telling time using …… minutes past ….. minutes to

k)  Addition of time –  horizontally

  –  vertically

  –  word statements

l)  Subtraction of time – horizontally

  – vertically

  – word statements

m)  Days of the week

n)  Months of the year.

o)  Months and their days

p)  The calendar.

 

2.  OPERATION ON NUMBERS

a)  Subtraction of numbers without regrouping up to three digits. (Vertically)

b)  Subtraction of numbers while regrouping. (2 digits by 1 digit)

c)  Subtraction of bigger or greater numbers while regrouping (2 digits by 2 digits)

d)  Subtraction of greater numbers while regrouping (3 digits by 2 or 1 digit)

e)  Word statements in subtraction with regrouping.

 

 

3.  MEASURES

Money

a)  Definition/ introduction of money

b)  Types/ examples of money

c)  Sources of money

d)  Uses of money

e)  Denominations

f)  Changing money

g)  Addition of money –  horizontally

–  vertically

–  word statements involving addition.

h)  Subtraction of money –  horizontally

–  vertically

–  word statements involving subtraction.

i)  Multiplication of money –  horizontally

–  vertically

–  word statements involving multiplication.

j)  Money and shopping

 

4.  ALGEBRA

a)  Completing algebraic statements of multiplication (horizontally & vertically)

b)  Word statements involving multiplication.

c)  Completing algebraic statements of division (horizontally & vertically)

d)  Word statements involving division.

 

1.  TIME

1.  There are 12 hours during the day.

2.  There are 12 hours during the night.

3.  Twenty four hours make a day.

4.  There are 12 hours/ numbers in a clock face.

5.  There are different activities done during the day and those done during the night.

6.  There are five minutes from one hour to another.

7.  There are 60 minutes in an hour.

8.  There are 30 minutes in half an hour.

9.  There are three hands in a clock face.

10.  A clock face can be circular, rectangular, squared.

11.  When the long hand points to 12, we say the hour where the hour hand is pointing.  

Image From EcoleBooks.com 5 minutes from one hour to another.

Image From EcoleBooks.com

– The minute hand is long and thin.

– The hour hand is short, big black and thick.

 

 

 

Qn: What time is it?

 It is two o’clock.

 Activity

2.  Tell the time in full hours

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com3.  Show the time in full hours.

 

 

 

 

It is four o’clock it is twelve o’clock

 

Note:

– More of this work will be done in pupil’s books

– Pupils will write the time using words not figures as we emphasize in English and literacy 1.

Ref: Mk. Pri. MTC Bk.2 Pg. 131

 

 

4.  Telling and showing time on a clock face using a half past…

Image From EcoleBooks.com  Note: When the minute hand points to 6, we say, “A half past …….” (Do not add on o’clock)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 A half past 8

Image From EcoleBooks.com  A half past eight.

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 A half past twelve

 

 

 

Activity

Show correct time

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

Note:

  • More of this work will be given to learners
  • Teacher can use paste work in order to waste time

 

 

 

5.  A quarter past (15 minutes past /fifteen minutes past)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  12

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  A quarter past

A quarter  A quarter past six

to 6 (a half past)

 

Activity

A quarter past nine  a quarter past four

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 

 

 

A quarter past one

 

 

 

 

 

6.  How we can use a quarter to or …….. to.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comWhen the minute hand points to 9, we only count the minutes remaining to reach 12

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  

 

 

It’s a quarter to 3  it’s a quarter to 7

Activity

a)  Pupils will be helped to tell time shown

b)  Pupils will be helped to show given time

 

Image From EcoleBooks.com7.  More work on time will be given. (mixed work on time)

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

8.  Addition of time (Horizontally)  

 3 min + 4 min = _____ min

 5 hours + 10 hours = _____ hours

 6 hours + 4 hours + 2 hours = _____ hours

 24 hours + 12 hours = _______ hours

 17 hours + 9 hours = _______ hours.

More addition of time (vertically)

  8 hrs 1 6 min 1 3 4 min

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  + 7hrs + 1 0 min +1 0 2 min

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

9.   3 8 9 hrs 6 5 2 hrs 6 9 8 min

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  +1 0 0 hrs + 1 9 hrs +1 0 4 min

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

10.  Read the word statements, copy the figure and add time correctly.

a)  Mr. Musoke taught for 7hrs. Mr. Ntuuyo taught for 6hrs. How many hours did both of them teach?

b)  A bus driver drove for 103hrs. The lorry driver drove for 217hrs.

  1. What is their total time?
  2. Who drove for more hours
  3. How many more hours did the lorry driver drove than the bus driver?
  4. What is the difference between their time?

 

11.  Subtraction of time.

 Pupils will be helped to subtract time horizontally.

a)  9hrs – 7hrs = _____ hrs

b)  14hrs – 9hrs = _____hrs

c)  25min – 10min = ______ min

d)  100hrs – 50hrs = ______ hrs

e)  What is fifteen minute take away ten minutes equal to?

 

More work on subtraction of time vertically

a) T  O T  O T  O

  4  2min 6  3hrs 8  9mins

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com   -1  0min   -5  2hrs   –  2  6mins

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  

12. H  T  O H  T  O H  T  O

6  7  2min 4  0  0min 5  9  4hrs

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com   – 1  0  2min   -2  0  0min   –  7  1hrs

 

Work statements on subtraction of time.

a)  Find the difference between 24hrs and 13hrs.

b)  What is 376min and 124min less?

c)  A motorcycle moved for 836hrs. A lorry moved for 736hrs. Find the difference between the hours.

13.  Days of the week.

Pupils will be taught the days of the week in their orders.

  • Sunday is the first day of the week.
  • Monday is the second day of the week.
  • Tuesday is the third day of the week.
  • Wednesday is the fourth day of the week.
  • Thursday is the fifth day of the week.
  • Friday is the sixth day of the week.
  • Sarturday is the seventh day of the week.

    Teacher will give oral questions about the days of the week.

    Fill in the missing days of the week.

    a)  Sarturday, _____________, Monday, __________, Wednesday, ________

    b)  Tuesday, _____________, Thursday, _____________, Sarturday, __________

    c)  Sarturday, ____________, Thursday, _____________, Tuesday, ___________

    d)  Monday, Sunday, _____________, _______________, ________________

    e)  Wednesday, ______________, Friday, ___________, Sunday, ___________

    Pupils can write days from jumbled letters.

    14.  More questions about days of the week.

a)  How many days are there in two weeks?

b)  What is the fifth day of the week?

c)  Write the days of the week that begin with letter S.

d)  When do you go for Juma prayers?

e)  For how many days do you come to school?

f)  On which day of the week do Christians go to church?

g)  What is the second day of the week?

h)  How many days form a week?

 Ref: A new MK primary MTC. Bk 2 pg 122

 

 

15.  Months of the year.

There are twelve months in a year.

There are 365 or 366 days in a year.

Different months have different days.

Months have names according to the area/region.

Below are months of the year in their correct order.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Teacher can formulate questions from the lesson basing on the time and ability of the learners.

16.  Months of the year and their days.

January 31 days

February 28/29 days

March 31 days

April 30 days

May 31 days

June 30 days

July 31 days

August 31 days

September 30 days

October 31 days

November 30 days

December 31 days

  • Teacher will give the learners a trick of learning months and their days easily.
  • Teacher will formulate question from that lesson.
  • Pupils will discuss answers orally with their teacher.
  • Pupils will do an activity with their teacher.

    Ref: Mk. Bk.2 pg. 134  Pr. mtc for Ug. Bk2

17.  The calendar.

Sunday

 

7th

14th

21st

28th

Monday

1st

8th

15th

22nd

29th

Tuesday

2nd

9th

16th

23rd

30th

Wednesday

3rd

10th

17th

24th

 

Thursday

4th

11th

18th

25th

 

Friday

5th

12th

19th

26th

 

Saturday

6th

13th

20th

27th

 

September 2014

 

 

 

 

 

Activity.

a)  Pupils will make numbers ordinal

b)  Pupils will answer questions about the calendar orally.

c)  Pupils will write the calendar in their books.

d)  Pupils will do an exercise about the lesson.

18.  Operation on numbers(let the pupils together with the teacher subtract without regrouping.)

Subtraction with regrouping.

Image From EcoleBooks.coma)  Two digits on top and one digit below.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com 01  12

Image From EcoleBooks.com –  9

Image From EcoleBooks.com –   3

Note: teach the learners to master that we regroup when the number on top is less.

T  O

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  ooo  34  11 ooooooooooo

Image From EcoleBooks.com 1   8

2   3

Image From EcoleBooks.com  

 

Activity a)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com T  O  T  O

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com12  11  23  16  6 is less than 8. Go to tens and

–   7   –   8  borrow 1 ten

–  40   2   8  16 – 8 = 8

1 is less than tens go to 2 -0 = 2

tens and borrow 1 ten

11 – 7 = 4

1 – 1 = 0

Image From EcoleBooks.com  T  O

 4  0

  –  9

 

 

19.  b.  (Two digits by two digits)

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  T  O T  O T  O

 2  1 3  4 5  2

– 1  9 – 1  6 – 1  8

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comc. (Three digits by two digits)

H  T  O H  T  O H  T  O

3  5  1 6  3  0 5  1  1

–  2  4 –  1  9 –  2  0

 

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com20.  d.  (Three digits by three digits)

Image From EcoleBooks.com  H  T  O H  T  O H  T  O

 2  2  4 9  3  7 2  6  0

– 1  0  6   – 4  2  8   – 1  0  8

 

These are many lessons. Teachers should be systematic and considerate.

 

21.  Word problems on subtraction with regrouping.

Pupils will be helped to read the statements. Write them and copy out numbers correctly.

Example 1

a)  Mary had 25 eggs. 19 of them got broken. How many eggs remained?

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com T  O

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com 12  15eggs  OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

– 1  9eggs

Image From EcoleBooks.com –  6eggs  six eggs remained.

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Example 2

b)  In a basket, there were 321 apples. 17 of them got rotten. How many apples remained?

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com H  T  O

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com 3  12  11apples  OOOOOOOOOOO

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com –   1  7apples  O

Image From EcoleBooks.com 3   0  4 OOO

Three hundred four apples were good.

(More of this work will be given to the learners.)

22.  MEASURES:

Money:

a)  What is money?

 Money is what we use to buy what we want.

 Money is a medium of exchange

Introduction

Long ago, people used to exchange goods for goods and services for services. This was known as Barter trade. As time went on, people introduced Cowrie shells as money to pay for goods and services. When Indians came, they introduced rupee (rupia). When the people became modern, they improved on the rupee and formed shillings both in coins and notes which are used up to today.

b)  Examples of money used in different countries.

  • In Uganda we use shillings.
  • In Kenya they use shillings.
  • In Nigeria they use Naira.
  • In England/United Kingdom they used pounds.
  • In America they use American Dollars.
  • In Rwanda they use Franks/ mafarang.

 

c)  Uses of money.

Money is very useful in day to day life. We use money to run many things.

  • Money is used to buy basic needs.
  • We use money to pay for different bills.
  • We use money to pay school dues.
  • We use money to buy building materials.
  • We use money to buy land and to buy cars.

Note: Pupils will mention many more things they know about money.

23.  Examples of cons used in Uganda.

a)  50 (fifty shillings coin)

 100 (one hundred shillings coin)

 200 (two hundred shillings coin)

 500  (Five hundred shillings coin)

 1000 (One thousand shillings coin)

Note: Teacher will allow pupils have a look at all the above coins. They will tell the features on the coins. They can also trace these cons.

 

b)  Examples of notes used in Uganda.

1000 (One thousand shillings note)

2000 (Two thousand shillings note)

5000 (Five thousand shillings note)

10,000 (Ten thousand shillings note)

20,000 (Twenty thousand shillings note)

50,000 (Fifty thousand shillings note)

Note: Each of the above notes will be shown to the pupils and different features will be discussed.

 

c)  What do you see on this coin or note?

  • On a fifty coin?

    A head of a Kob with long horns

    The coat of arms

  • On a two thousand shilling note?

    It is blue in colour.

 

24.  Changing money.

Teacher should use real coins and notes for children to get the concept.

How many coins of ……….. add up to …………?

a)  How many coins of sh.50 add up to sh.100?

b)  How many coins of sh.100 add up to sh.200?

c)  How many coins of sh.500 add up to sh.1000?

d)  How many coins of sh.100 add up to sh.400?

e)  How many notes of sh.1000 make sh.2000?

Note: More work will be given to the learners considering the time and ability.

 

25.  Adding money horizontally

a)  Sh.50 + sh.50 = sh._________

b)  Sh.100 + sh.50 = sh._________

c)  Sh.200 + sh.100 = sh._________

d)  Sh.300 + sh.100 +sh.200 =sh._________

e)  Sh.500 + sh.500 =sh._________

 

26.  Money.

Add money correctly. Arrange figures going down.

a)  sh. 3 0 0 sh. 1 5 0 sh. 7 0 0

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  sh. + 5 0   +sh. 1 0 0   +sh. 1 0 0

 

b)  sh. 1 0 0 0 sh. 4 0 0 0 sh. 5 0 0 0

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com +sh. 1 5 0 0   +sh. 3 5 0   +sh. 3 0 0 0

 

27.  Word statements(pupils can divide the pages)

Read the statement, understand it, copy out the figures and add correctly.

a)  Rhena has sh.150.

 Mercy has sh.200. How much money do the girls have?

Sh. 2 0 0

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com +sh. 1 5 0

 

b)  Add sh.900 to sh.500. What do you get?

c)  Find the sum of sh.50 and sh.50.

d)  Tr.Doreen had sh.5000. Mr.Kafeero gave her more sh.3000. How much money did she spend altogether?

 

More of such work will be given to leaners

28.  Subtraction of money. (Horizontally)

a)  sh.100 – sh.50 = sh. _____

b)  sh.200 – sh.100 = sh. _____

c)  sh.500 – sh.400 = sh. _____

d)  sh.1000 – sh.500 = sh. _____

e)  sh.750 – sh.700 = sh. _____

 

Image From EcoleBooks.com29.  Arrange the figures vertically and subtract.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com Sh.  5  0  0  sh.  1  5  0

Image From EcoleBooks.com   – sh.  1  0  0 – sh.  1  0  0

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com Sh.  4  0  0  

Image From EcoleBooks.com   5 – 1 = 4  0 – 0 = 0  0 – 0 = 0  

Image From EcoleBooks.com Sh. 1  0  0  0  sh.  9  5  0

  – sh.  5  0  0 – sh.  8  0  0

Image From EcoleBooks.com

Image From EcoleBooks.com Sh.  4  0  0  sh.  2  0  0  0

  – sh.  2  0  0 – sh. 5  0  0

 

30.  Read the statements carefully, subtract and show how you get the answer.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com  Semusu had sh.900. He used sh.750. How much money did he remain with?

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com Sh. 8 9  10  0  0 – 0 = 0

  – sh.  7  5  0  0 is less than 5. Go to hundred an borrow 1 ten

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com Sh.  1  5  0  10 – 5 = 5

8 – 7 = 1

 
 

He remained with sh.150.

Peter had sh.1000. He gave away sh.500. How much money remained?

Image From EcoleBooks.com Sh. 1 0 0 0

  –  Sh. 5 0 0

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com Sh. 5 0 0

More work will be given to the learners.

 

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com31.  Money and shopping at the market.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 Cabbage sugarcane  pineapple orange  apple

 Sh.700 sh.300 sh.1000 sh.100  sh.500

a)  What is the cost of a pineapple?

b)  Find the cost of a cabbage and an orange.

c)  How much will daddy pay for 2 apples?

d)  Find the cost of a sugarcane and cabbage.

e)  Find the total cost of 3 sugarcanes.

  • Pupils will read the questions with teacher’s guidance.
  • Pupils will do some numbers on the chalkboard.
  • Some work will be done in pupil’s books.

 

32.  Shopping at the shop/ supermarket

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com

 

 A book a pencil a cake a ruler

 Sh.200 sh.500 sh.800 sh.350

Study the prices carefully and answer the questions.

a)  What is the cost of a cake?

b)  What is the most expensive item?

c)  What is the cheapest item?

d)  How much shall I pay for 3 pencils?

e)  What is the cost of a book, aruler and a cake?

More of such questions will be given to the learners.

Note:

Teachers can give more of such work as revision, morning work or an additional homework.

 

33.  Multiplication of money.

a) sh. 2 0 0 sh. 1 0 0 sh. 5 0

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com x   2 x   4 x  2

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com sh. 4 0 0

0x2=0 0x2=0 2×2=4

b) sh. 3 0 0 sh. 1 0 0 0 sh. 4 0 0

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com x   3 x   5 x   2

Image From EcoleBooks.com

 

34.  More multiplication of money

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comb)  One cake costs sh.300. Find the cost of 3 cakes.

Image From EcoleBooks.com Sh. 3 0 0  0 x 3 = 0

Image From EcoleBooks.com X   3  0 x 3 = 0

Sh. 9 0 0  3 x 3 = 9

Matiya bought 3 sambusas each at 500/=. Find the total cost.

 Sh. 5 0 0  0 x 3 = 0

 X 3  0 x 3 = 0

Image From EcoleBooks.com  Sh. 1 5 0 0  5 x 3 = 15

 

If a book costs 150/= what is the cost of 2 books?

 Sh.  1 5 0 0 x 2 = 0

Image From EcoleBooks.com  X   2 5 x 2 = 10

 Sh.  3 0 0 1 x 2 = 2 + 1 = 3

 

35.  Study the price list below and use it to answer the questions.

 Item  price

 A bag sh.10,000

 Carrots sh.1,000

 A belt sh.3,000

 A kilo of meat sh.7,000

 Blue band sh.1,500

a)  How much is a tin of blueband?

b)  What is the cost of 2 carrots?

c)  How much is a kg of meat?

d)  If Ann has sh.2,000 and buys carrots. How much money will she remain with?

e)  If Mummy had sh.10,000 and bought a bag. How much balance will she get back?

  • Teacher will formulate more questions from the price lists.
  • Teacher will guide learners to get correct answers.

 

 

36.  ALGEBRA:

Complete the mathematical statements sensibly.

Example 1

Image From EcoleBooks.com X 2 = 6

 

Note: When a missing number is at the beginning and sign in multiplication, we divide the given numbers to get the answer.

So the statement will be,

Image From EcoleBooks.com  3 x 2 = 6

= 6 ÷ 2

= 3

Image From EcoleBooks.com  5 x 2 = 10

= 10 ÷ 5

= 2

  • Teacher will give as many examples to the learners as possible to help them grasp the concept.
  • Teacher will give numbers to individuals, groups and then in books.

37.  Activity

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com X 3 = 9 4 x   = 16

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com X 4 = 8 5 x   = 15

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com X 5 = 25 2 x   = 20

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com X 2 = 12 3 x   = 18

 

Note: let the activity be related to the examples given.

 

38.  Complete the statements arranged vertically

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com 2

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com X 6  = 12 ÷ 6

12  = 2

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com 5  = 15 ÷ 5

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.com X 3  = 3

15

  • More of such work will be given on the chalkboard for individuals and groups.
  • An exercise will be given to the learners in their books.

 

 

39.  Read the statement and form an algebraic statement then complete it correctly.

Image From EcoleBooks.coma)  Think of a number, multiply it by two and get 16 as your answer. What is the number?

8 x 2 = 16

= 16 ÷ 2

= 8

b)  Think of a number, multiply it by 3. You will get 9 as your answer. What is the number?

Image From EcoleBooks.com 3 x 3 = 9

= 9 ÷ 3

= 3

 

40.  Completing statements involving divisions.

Image From EcoleBooks.coma)  6 ÷ 3 = 2

= 6 ÷ 2

= 3

Note:

These are direct statements. To get the answer you need to divide right away and get a correct answer.

 

Image From EcoleBooks.com41.  b) ÷ 4 = 4

Note:

Here, in such statements when the box is at the beginning and the sign is a division sign, you will have to multiply because you are looking for a bigger number.

Image From EcoleBooks.comImage From EcoleBooks.comSo,  16 ÷ 4 = 4

= 4 x 4

Image From EcoleBooks.com = 16

Image From EcoleBooks.comc)  18 ÷ 3 = 6

= 6 x 3

= 18

  • More examples will be given to the learners.
  • More practice is needed because the concept is not easy.
  • There is need for one to one teaching.

 

42.  Read the statements, copy out the figures and complete correctly.

 a)  Find the box if divided by 2 you get 8

Image From EcoleBooks.com ÷  2  =  8

Image From EcoleBooks.com =  8 x 2

=  16

Box is equal to sixteen.

Image From EcoleBooks.comb)  Think of a number, divide it by 3. The answer is 3

Image From EcoleBooks.com   9   ÷ 3 = 3

= 3 x 3

= 9

 

 




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EcoleBooks | PRIMARY TWO MATHEMATICS LESSON NOTES - TERM I

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